I write about whatever is on my mind.
I created this blog not because I wanted the rest of the world to see, I just like blogs and I want to have one too.

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I grew and ate these this summer!

I grew and ate these this summer!

(Source: sleikas)

Nopales

Nopales

VENUS FLYTRAP 
The Venus Flytrap (also Venus’s Flytrap or Venus’ Flytrap), Dionaea muscipula, is a carnivorous plant that catches and digests animal prey—mostly insects and arachnids. Its trapping structure is formed by the terminal portion of each of the plant’s leaves and is triggered by tiny hairs on their inner surfaces. When an insect or spider crawling along the leaves contacts a hair, the trap closes if a different hair is contacted within twenty seconds of the first strike. The requirement of redundant triggering in this mechanism serves as a safeguard against a waste of energy in trapping objects with no nutritional value.

VENUS FLYTRAP 

The Venus Flytrap (also Venus’s Flytrap or Venus’ Flytrap), Dionaea muscipula, is a carnivorous plant that catches and digests animal prey—mostly insects and arachnids. Its trapping structure is formed by the terminal portion of each of the plant’s leaves and is triggered by tiny hairs on their inner surfaces. When an insect or spider crawling along the leaves contacts a hair, the trap closes if a different hair is contacted within twenty seconds of the first strike. The requirement of redundant triggering in this mechanism serves as a safeguard against a waste of energy in trapping objects with no nutritional value.

Synsepalum dulcificum also known as the miracle fruit is a plant with a berry that, when eaten, causes sour foods (such aslemons and limes) subsequently consumed to taste sweet. This effect is due to miraculin, which is used commercially as asugar substitute. Common names for this species and its berry include miracle fruit, miracle berry, miraculous berry ,sweet berry, and in West Africa where the species originates agbayun,  taami, asaa, and ledidi.

Synsepalum dulcificum also known as the miracle fruit is a plant with a berry that, when eaten, causes sour foods (such aslemons and limes) subsequently consumed to taste sweet. This effect is due to miraculin, which is used commercially as asugar substituteCommon names for this species and its berry include miracle fruitmiracle berrymiraculous berry ,sweet berry, and in West Africa where the species originates agbayun,  taamiasaa, and ledidi.

Lithops - succulent 
Native to South Africa 
Individual Lithops plants consist of one or more pairs of bulbous, almost fused leaves opposite to each other and hardly any stem. The slit between the leaves contains the meristem and produces flowers and new leaves. The leaves of Lithopsare mostly buried below the surface of the soil, with a partially or completely translucent top surface or window allowing light to enter the interior of the leaves for photosynthesis.

Lithops - succulent 

Native to South Africa 

Individual Lithops plants consist of one or more pairs of bulbous, almost fused leaves opposite to each other and hardly any stem. The slit between the leaves contains the meristem and produces flowers and new leaves. The leaves of Lithopsare mostly buried below the surface of the soil, with a partially or completely translucent top surface or window allowing light to enter the interior of the leaves for photosynthesis.

New Mexico! 

New Mexico! 

Franklinia Altamaha 
Native to Altamaha River Valley in Georgia 
Philadelphia botanists John and William Batram first observed the tree growing along the Altamaha River near Fort Barrington in the British colony o Georgia in October 1765. John Bartram recorded "severall very curious shrubs" in his journal entry for October 1, 1765. William Bartram returned several times to the same location on the Altamaha during a collecting trip to the American South, funded by Dr. John Fothergill of London. William Bartram collected Franklinia seemds during this extended trip to the South from 1773 through 1776, a journey described in his book Bartram’s Travels published in Philadelphia in 1791. William Bartram brought seed of Franklinia back to Philadelphia in 1777, and had flowering plants by 1781. After several years of study, Bartram assigned the “rare and elegant flowering shrub,” to a new genus Franklinia, named in honor of his father’s great friend Benjamin Franklin. The new plant name, Franklinia alatamaha was first published by a Bartram cousin, Humphry Marshall in 1785 in his catalogue of North American trees and shrubs entitled Arbustrum Americanum. (Marshall 1785: 48-50; Fry 2001).

Franklinia Altamaha 

Native to Altamaha River Valley in Georgia 

Philadelphia botanists John and William Batram first observed the tree growing along the Altamaha River near Fort Barrington in the British colony o Georgia in October 1765. John Bartram recorded "severall very curious shrubs" in his journal entry for October 1, 1765. William Bartram returned several times to the same location on the Altamaha during a collecting trip to the American South, funded by Dr. John Fothergill of London. William Bartram collected Franklinia seemds during this extended trip to the South from 1773 through 1776, a journey described in his book Bartram’s Travels published in Philadelphia in 1791. William Bartram brought seed of Franklinia back to Philadelphia in 1777, and had flowering plants by 1781. After several years of study, Bartram assigned the “rare and elegant flowering shrub,” to a new genus Franklinia, named in honor of his father’s great friend Benjamin Franklin. The new plant name, Franklinia alatamaha was first published by a Bartram cousin, Humphry Marshall in 1785 in his catalogue of North American trees and shrubs entitled Arbustrum Americanum. (Marshall 1785: 48-50; Fry 2001).

Amaranth Caudatus “Love-lies-bleeding” 
Nativity- Africa, India, Peru 

Edible 

Amaranth Caudatus “Love-lies-bleeding” 

Nativity- Africa, India, Peru 

Edible 

D

Drosera capensis, commonly known as the Cape sundew, is a small rosette-forming carnivorous species of perennial[1]sundew native to the Cape in South Africa. Because of its size, easy to grow nature, and the copious amounts of seed it produces, it has become one of the most common sundews in cultivation. D. capensis produces strap-like leaves, up to 3.5 cm long (not including the petiole) and 0.5 cm wide,[2] which, as in all sundews, are covered in brightly coloured tentacles which secrete a sticky mucilage that traps arthropods. When insects are first trapped, the leaves roll lengthwise by thigmotropism toward the center. This aids digestion by bringing more digestive glands in contact with the prey. This movement is surprisingly fast, with completion in thirty minutes. The plant has a tendency to retain the dead leaves of previous seasons, and the main stem of the plant can become quite long and woody with time.

D

Drosera capensis, commonly known as the Cape sundew, is a small rosette-forming carnivorous species of perennial[1]sundew native to the Cape in South Africa. Because of its size, easy to grow nature, and the copious amounts of seed it produces, it has become one of the most common sundews in cultivation. D. capensis produces strap-like leaves, up to 3.5 cm long (not including the petiole) and 0.5 cm wide,[2] which, as in all sundews, are covered in brightly coloured tentacles which secrete a sticky mucilage that traps arthropods. When insects are first trapped, the leaves roll lengthwise by thigmotropism toward the center. This aids digestion by bringing more digestive glands in contact with the prey. This movement is surprisingly fast, with completion in thirty minutes. The plant has a tendency to retain the dead leaves of previous seasons, and the main stem of the plant can become quite long and woody with time.